Ange pleased with intent

Melbourne Victory coach Ange Postecoglou praised his team for persisting with their attempts at possession-based play during their 4-1 loss to Olympiacos on Saturday night.

Melbourne Victory coach Ange Postecoglou praised his team for persisting with their attempts at possession-based play during their 4-1 loss to Olympiacos on Saturday night.

A brace from Spanish striker David Fuster gave the Greek giants a comfortable win at Etihad Stadium.

Despite several nervy moments passing out from defence in a bid to launch attacking moves, Victory continued trying to put their new style into practice.

Postecoglou, who has been working with the squad for less than three weeks, said he was pleased with his players' intent.

"It was entertaining and we played our part in that. They're a good side ... I thought our intent was good," Postecoglou said.

"We tried to play some football, at no stage were we just pumping it long and trying to play for survival.

"We actually had some good intent, but obviously the quality of the opposition, you get punished for your mistakes and we got punished.

"We probably are lacking a bit of quality at times to damage them. It was as much as I could have asked for from the players considering all the factors."

Victory were 3-0 down inside 25 minutes, before Archie Thompson struck from the penalty spot to get one back.

The risks involved in the willingness of Postecoglou's men to work the ball out from defence were highlighted in the 89th minute, when Fuster sealed the game with his second goal.

Goalkeeper Lawrence Thomas, who had performed well, under-hit a short pass which was intercepted, leading to Fuster's effort.

Postecoglou said the loss to the Greek league and cup champions would prove to be a lesson for his team.

"If you have the intent to play football, you can - if you do the right things," he said.

"You also find out, at this level, mistakes get punished pretty severely.

"That's probably the biggest lesson they'll take out of it. Understanding the difference in level and quality of opposition.

"Maybe mistakes at youth team level, where most of them play, or even at A-League level, you might get away with, against quality opposition you don't.

"The flip side of that, as I said, when they tried to play at times and got into the right areas, they could.

"There was enough out there to encourage them but there was a little bit of a forewarning as to the jump they need to make."