Victory and TAC join forces in seatbelt campaign

Footy fans across Victoria are urged to get behind this weekend’s first ever Road Safety Round as part of a Transport Accident Commission campaign marking 40 years since Victoria became the first place in the world to make wearing seatbelts compulsory.

Footy fans across Victoria are urged to get behind this weekend-s first ever Road Safety Round as part of a Transport Accident Commission campaign marking 40 years since Victoria became the first place in the world to make wearing seatbelts compulsory.

The month-long campaign is crossing football codes and regional boundaries as players in the A-League, AFL, VFL and TAC Cup this weekend change their playing outfits to feature specially-made seatbelt strips.

AFL team Essendon and TAC Cup teams the Bendigo Pioneers and Oakleigh Chargers kick off Road Safety Round on Friday night wearing their one-off strips, followed by on Saturday by VFL teams the Bendigo Bombers and Coburg Tigers, with A-League team Melbourne Victory on Saturday night.

The seatbelt strips are the first significant change all the clubs have made to their jumpers.

Essendon ruckman, David Hille and Melbourne Victory defender Adrian Leijer are the ambassadors for the Road Safety Round. David-s personal experience of being involved in a serious collision at the age of 18, in which three teenagers died, was the motivator behind his involvement.

Both sportsmen have starred in TV commercials that are currently airing across Victoria. Click here to view Adrian Leijer's TV commercial

The TAC-s Head of Community Relations, Phil Reed, urged all Victorian sport fans to support the teams and the campaign to recognise the importance of the legislation and the effect it has had on road safety in Victoria.

“There is no doubt the introduction of seatbelt legislation has proved life-saving,” Mr Reed said.

“In 1970, when the legislation was introduced, more than 1000 people died on our roads and after just one year of the new law that number dropped 13 per cent.”

Last year, Victoria recorded its lowest-ever road toll with 290 deaths.

“But, a quarter of those drivers and passengers who died weren-t wearing a seatbelt.”

Mr Reed said all Victorians should use this campaign and the efforts of their footy heroes as motivation to belt up and drive safely.

“Every Victorian has a responsibility to keep our roads safe, and you can start with the simple step of buckling up.”